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URBS 3310: Race, Space and Urban Schools

Prof. Chandler Miranda, Fall 2021

Education & urban studies literature databases

  • ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) is an online library of education research and information sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education, and contains citations, abstracts, and full-text for articles in education periodicals and other publications. ERIC is available through a variety of platforms:
    • ERIC via the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE)/Institute of Education Sciences (IES)/U.S. Department of Education - This is freely available for anyone to search. You might also need to search for the content in CLIO and/or Educat to locate the material in the Columbia Libraries collections.
    • ERIC via EbscoHost - Access limited to Barnard/Columbia community; UNI is needed to access the database from off-campus. E-links will try to directly connect you to content in Columbia Libraries collections. In EBSCO, you can simultaneously search across ERIC, Education Full Text, and Education Research Complete.
    • ERIC via ProQuest - Access limited to Barnard/Columbia community; UNI is needed to access the database from off-campus. E-links will try to connect you to content in Columbia Libraries collections. Thesaurus difficult to browse. 

Database search tips

  • The general search tips for CLIO also apply to the article databases.
  • If you find an article or a book that is relevant, the bibliography/works cited page can be a useful road map to other relevant literature that was previously published.  
  • If you find an article or a book that is relevant, you can use Google Scholar and some other databases to find out whether it was cited by other scholars after it was published. Search for the title of an article/monograph and search and click on "Cited by" to generate a list of publications that have referenced that source.
  • In many databases, you can narrow your results to scholarly publications only. Look for "limit to ... scholarly publications/peer-reviewed/refereed publications only" or similar language. This will help you find articles from journals that have gone through a rigorous peer review process.